The Great Migrations Blog Carnival: Part II


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As you know, on the eve of Great Migrations premiere last Sunday, a group of science bloggers shared their thoughts on the series from the perspective of their expertise. In time for the next set of Great Migrations episodes—Feast or Famine,” “Race to Survive,” and the Behind-the-Scenes look this Sunday, November 14, we’re bringing you a round-up of six additional reviews that will make you want to watch the first two and the Science of Great Migrations episodes again and get ready for more!

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Jason Goldman, a graduate student in Developmental Psychology at the University of Southern California and editor of Open Lab 2010 and ResearchBlogging.org, joined us at the premiere of Great Migrations in LA a couple of weeks ago. Jason writes on his blog, The Thoughtful Animal, that “series like Great Migrations are important to science education and to nature conservancy.” Based on his impression of the first episode, Jason looks forward to seeing more emphasis on “the struggle of the predators to find enough food” in the remaining episodes. Read more of Jason’s thoughts and additional features on Great Migrations such as this week’s Awesome Animal Video pick at The Thoughtful Animal.

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After watching the series, Debbie Hadley at About.com’s Insect blog states “there’s plenty for bug lovers to cheer about in Great Migrations.” longtime naturalist and teacher, as well as a member of the Monarch Teacher Network who raises Monarch butterflies in her own backyard (!), Debbie says, “I’ve never been to Mexico to witness the migration with my own eyes, but Born to Move made me feel like I’ve been there.” Read more of Debbie’s thoughts on Great Migrations at About.com’s Insect blog.

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Madhusudan Katti, Assistant Professor of Vertebrate Ecology at the California State University in Fresno, traces his fascination with migration to his Ph.D. thesis on Phylloscopus leaf warblers—the namesake of his blog, A Leaf Warbler’s Gleanings and Twitter handle—as well as his personal history as someone who lives half way around the world from many of his family members. Madhu marvels at the tenacity of red crabs as they battle the rocky cliffs, turbulent tides, and of course, the yellow crazy ant, Anoplolepis gracilipes, who, though no doubt disruptive to the ecosystem of the Christmas Island, is still no comparison for the impact of humans. Read more of Madhu’s thoughts and additional Great Migrations reviews at A Leaf Warbler’s Gleanings and Reconciliation Ecology.

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Evolution expert Adrian Thysse talks about Great Migrations at one of his many blogs, A Natural Evolution, and shares, “it is good to be reminded of the grand natural spectacle the migrations are.” Adrian, like many of his colleagues, points to the online resources on Great Migrations, as well as the November issue of National Geographic Magazine on the same subject, to round out one’s experience of this global programming event. Read more of Adrian’s thoughts and look for more Great Migrations reviews at A Natural Evolution.

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Science journalist Allie Wilkinson declares on her blog, Oh, For the Love of Science! that Great Migrations is “undoubtedly the best nature miniseries event of the year.” Preparing us for what’s ahead in Great Migrations, Allie reminds us “migrations are Darwinian in the extreme, and illustrate many of the perils and hardships these migratory species face-whether it is a old predator in their natural environment, or a new, more foreign danger—Man.” Read more of Allie’s thoughts on Great Migrations and look for her review on this Sunday’s Behind-the-Scenes episode at Oh, For the Love of Science!

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Last but not least, a hat tip to the mention of Great Migrations from Jack Hassard—Emeritus Professor of Science Education at Georgia State University—at The Art of Teaching Science, who directs his readers to the educational, multimedia resources about the featured animals on the Great Migrations website.

Once again, we’d like to thank the science bloggers who joined us on the Great Migrations blog carnival, as well as everyone who took time to check out the series and share thoughts through blogs, Twitter, and Facebook accounts. Be sure to check out the first round-up of the Great Migrations blog carnival if you missed it last week, and join us again this Sunday, November 14 at 8pm et/pt to continue your journey with Great Migrations on National Geographic Channel!

Comments

  1. christinaray12
    November 25, 2010, 5:46 am

    Hi,
    I have enjoy "Awesome Animal Video" series. I think National Geographic is the source for photos, free desktop wallpapers of places, animals, nature, underwater, travel, and many more..All the best.
    Thanks,
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  2. christinaray12
    November 25, 2010, 5:46 am

    Hi,
    I have enjoy "Awesome Animal Video" series. I think National Geographic is the source for photos, free desktop wallpapers of places, animals, nature, underwater, travel, and many more..All the best.
    Thanks,
    pregnancy signs