Robin’s Nest


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American Robins are common North American birds known for their round, warm-hued body and lively song. During breeding season, a male and female form a pairing relationship. Then the female chooses a nesting site (a tree, bush or even gutter) and skillfully builds a bowl-shaped nest from the inside-out.

The female American robin gathers flexible, sturdy materials, such as dead grass, small twigs, rootlets, feathers and mud and brings them to her chosen nesting site. She uses her wings to press and mold the beginnings of a cup-shaped shell. When complete, her nest will be 6-8 inches wide and up to six inches high.

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When she is ready, she will lay a clutch of 3-5 unmarked sky-blue eggs, each about the side of a quarter. An American Robin can produce three broods annually, and often she will reuse a nest or favorite nesting site.

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The eggs will incubate for up to two weeks. When they hatch, the American robin chicks are helpless, mostly bare with just a fluttering of down feathers. They will stay in the nest for about 13 days before they take flight for the first time.

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Learn all about the American Robin. If you enjoy observing birds in the wild, visit this backyard birding resource and identify the species in your own neighborhood.

Photo credits: Jodi Kendall