Tag archives for Specials

What’s better than a night of classic National Geographic nature specials? A night of classic National Geographic nature specials overdubbed by the guys from ”Mystery Science Theater 3000,” of course. Tonight, Nat Geo Channel presents Total Riff Off, an evening of wacky commentary from the minds behind the famous TV show “Mystery Science Theater 3000.”  Three of the…

A true band of brothers, the Charlie Company was one of the last combat infantry companies in the Vietnam War to be drafted, trained and sent to battle together. Brothers In War tells the gripping story of the Charlie Company, tracing their journey of terror, pain and camaraderie from boot camp to combat to home.…

Science is an endless search, binding the generations in a constant quest for learning. Continuing the tradition of bringing the universe down to Earth is Neil deGrasse Tyson, the ideal scientist to transport a new generation of viewers to the cosmos. Born and raised in New York City, Tyson was infatuated with science from a…

Did you know – Betty White’s two childhood dream jobs were a Hollywood actress and a zookeeper? While Betty ended up striking it big on-screen instead of wrangling zoo animals, with over 60 years in show business under her belt, her love of animals, as she says, “goes back to the womb.”As the spokeswoman for National Geographic’s…

By Scott Aaronson, Senior Director for National Security Policy at the Edison Electric Institute The National Geographic Channel’s docudrama, American Blackout, depicts a 10-day nationwide blackout caused by a cyber attack. The film’s fictional cyber attack causes significant physical damage to the U.S. electric utility infrastructure that within a day brings down the entire grid.…

Swimming with Crocodiles

While some animals have a reputation for being notoriously dangerous, there is always the unusual exception. Growing up in South Africa, Roger Horrocks, naturally developed a fear of a dangerous local predator, the giant crocodile. It was only until his first, face to face, underwater encounter with a crocodile that he began to question his…

First Look: Killing Kennedy

Are you ready for the first glimpse into the cataclysmic and entangled journey centered around one of the most memorable moments of US history? An event that shook the nation decades ago continues to alter the state of the nation, and the course of history, is still just as powerful nearing it’s 50th anniversary. Rob…

One of the greatest challenges of making this film was using dramatic recreations to illustrate the different scenarios that may have led to the loss of the Hunley and her crew.  There are about a half-dozen theories that we chase down in the show, and each one had to be re-enacted, in part, inside an…

Filming the Samurai Subs

By: Writer/Director Devon Chivvis, Wild Life Productions Motion sickness. Diesel Fumes. Bunks with a 1 foot clearing to the ceiling.   Aboard the KOK mothership, this is the easy part.  Tomorrow I will be directing from inside a 7-foot diameter sphere at depths of over 3,000 feet.  This is not your average expedition, nor your average…

Heroin and Marijuana

This past Sunday, in the miniseries Drugs, Inc., Nat Geo exposed the worlds of Cocaine and Meth, telling the stories of growers and producers, traffickers, dealers, users, cops, and doctors who live in the world of drugs. Now, get a 360 degree view of the worlds of Heroin and Marijuana in their premieres this Monday…

Welcome to Twin Town

by the Twin Town production crew It’s 2 PM. We’re waiting for our luggage to emerge out of a curtained-off area onto a carrousel at Calicut International Airport, and we’re not alone. My Producer Camilla Banks and I are in the middle of a crush of hundreds of people. It’s a scene reminiscent of the stock exchange…

Drugs affect millions of people in our world every day. Illegal ones — like cocaine, methamphetamine, marijuana, and heroin — are some of the most impactful. In the upcoming miniseries Drugs, Inc., Nat Geo goes inside the world of these four substances, telling the stories of growers and producers, traffickers, dealers, users, cops, and doctors who…

The Mighty Mississippi

by Marcus Eriksen, Mississippi River Quest September 21, 22 Day 1 & 2 – 17 miles Lake Itasca, Minnesota (Mile 1347 UM) to Coffee Pot Landing (Mile 1330 UM) “I can jump over it,” Bill says to Stephen and me, standing in an ankle-deep stream that will soon become the Mighty Mississippi River. We’re standing…

Walking Through Fire

Fire is one of Earth’s greatest gifts to humanity. Humans, uniquely among all the animals of the world, managed to master it and utilize it to drive every major stage in the development of our civilization. In “How the Earth Changed History: The Gift of Fire,” Professor Iain Stewart dives directly into the flames —…

by Paul Williams, Production Crew, December 2009 It’s 50 degrees C [122 degrees F] and has a humidity of 100%, less than a hundred people have been inside and it’s so deadly that even with respirators and suits of ice you can only survive for 20 minutes before your body starts to fail. It’s the…

Twins Who Share a Brain

The Hogan twins have struggled to survive since they were conceived in the womb. Statistically, they had a 20% chance of being born alive. If they beat that hurdle then there was a 75% chance they’d die within 48 hours. Today, they are three years old and they are very much alive. The Hogan twins…

Circular Skyscraper

by Yasemin Rashit, Assistant Producer Aldar HQ construction is an interesting place. Incredibly orderly and neat for a construction site, one wonders if they cleaned it up because they knew we were coming. Before entering the actual construction area we pass through the makeshift Porto-cabin offices and are greeted by the clinical smell of TCP. Having…

What would happen if a Martian-sized dust storm came down to Earth? Dust storms on Mars and Earth are identical, save for the fact that those on Mars are many times larger and more powerful. Now, as human exploration of Mars creeps closer, exhaustive testing is underway to ensure that astronauts are protected from the…

Going Tribal in Texas

The two Kenyan guys are im the midst of an enlightening – and entertaining – journey through the U.S. Last week, the Maasai tribal warriors turned learned about ATMs, refrigerators, and hot dogs in New York City. This week, they’re traveling to Texas to check out the cowboy life. Just what will they encounter in their travels to the Lone…

"Stay AWAY From the Saw"

by Jose Jehuda Garcia My name is Jose and I’m one of the producers on “Cut it in Half: Fire Truck.” Like with any NatGeo show, producing Cut it in Half was an interesting, educational experience. And as we captured the images and researched the topic that comprises this program, I learned a lot of…

In the new NGC special, Inside the Body of Henry VIII, a team of medical experts, biographers, and historians investigate what could have caused the great physical and mental changes that England’s most notorious monarch underwent during his reign. As he grew older, the king transformed from a charming and athletic prince into a paranoid, obese…

Touched by Jesus?

Faith, by definition, means belief without proof. But what if science could shed light on some of Christianity’s greatest mysteries? Using laboratory blood tests, fiber analysis, and carbon dating, NGC puts three controversial claims about Jesus to the test. Can true believers experience his suffering through spontaneous stigmata? Was the Shroud of Turin the actual…

For decades, most investigators looking for a scientific explanation for the successive plagues inflicted upon Egypt in Exodus focused upon the first plague, the river of blood. As we discussed previously, the red color of the Nile and massive fish deaths have been attributed variously to sediment, anthrax, and an outbreak of a Pfiesteria piscicida, a…

In addition to the Exodus narrative, there’s other written evidence that the ancient Egyptians suffered some sort of awful succession of calamities. The Ipuwer Papyrus, an Egyptian manuscript that dates back to at least the beginning of that span, has the nightmarish feel of the first draft of a George Romero screenplay. “Hearts are violent, pestilence…

For me, the most heart-rending scene in the 1956 Cecil B. DeMille epic The Ten Commandments is the scene in which the Pharaoh, portrayed by Yul Brynner, pleads with a statue of Sokar, the falcon-headed Egyptian god of the underworld, to resurrect his firstborn son. The Pharaoh’s child, of course, has died in the last of the 10…