We Can’t Mako This Up, Sharkfest Is Back on Nat Geo Wild!

Did you know that the Hammerhead shark’s distinctive head shape is called the cephalofoil? Or that there are Great White Sharks just outside of the Golden Gate Bridge? Check out Sharkfest on Nat Geo Wild starting this Sunday for non-stop shark Summer fun! We’re diving in fin-first with Sharkatraz, and a look at one of the infamous prison’s most daring escapes. To break out of Alcatraz Prison, the biggest obstacle wasn’t the armed guards or the frigid waters surrounding the island—it was the sharks. Tune in Sunday at 8pm on Nat Geo Wild!

Here are five jawsdropping facts to get you ready for Sharkfest!

 

1) There are over 120 species of fish found in the San Francisco Bay.

Golden Gate Bridge with San Francisco in background

The list includes sharks, skates, and rays. Around eleven different species of shark are found in the Bay itself including the Pacific Angel shark and the Broadnose Sevengill shark.

2) The most common species of shark found in the Bay is the leopard shark.

Full length shot of a large and impressive Leopard shark (Stegostoma fasciatum) swimming to the surface of a coral reef near the Daymaniat Islands in Oman against a sunlit sea surface background.
Full length shot of a large and impressive Leopard shark (Stegostoma fasciatum) swimming to the surface of a coral reef near the Daymaniat Islands in Oman against a sunlit sea surface background.

Reaching up to five feet in length, this shark earned its name due to its recognizable dark spots. Leopard sharks are not known to be aggressive towards humans, and prefer to scour the ocean floor for small crabs, bony fish, and clams.

3) The Great White Shark is not officially listed on the Endangered Species List in California.

Great White Shark

However, it is still illegal to take any or all parts of a White shark for recreational or commercial use. Scientists must acquire a Scientific Collecting permit if they wish to gather readings or data about a White Shark.

4) Bull sharks are one of the most aggressive and dangerous sharks.

Bull shark (Carcharhinus leucas) swims through deep water off Mexico Yucatan Peninsula.
Bull shark (Carcharhinus leucas) swims through deep water off Mexico Yucatan Peninsula.

Reaching between seven and 11 feet, they have been known to feed on fish, birds, turtles, and even other sharks. Furthermore, unlike most sharks, the Bull shark can survive in fresh water for an extended period of time,  such as the Amazon River or the Mississippi.

5) Sharks and humans are surprisingly similar!

Shark and human eyes share many common properties: both contain a cornea, lens, retina, pupil and iris. Both hammerhead sharks and humans give birth to live young, have slow growth rates, and mature late in life. While humans usually only give birth to one baby, female Great Hammerheads can produce anywhere from 13 to 56 pups! Watch below to learn more about these mega sharks.

Don’t miss Sharkfest this Sunday at 8/7c on Nat Geo WILD!

Comments

  1. Alex
    Illinois
    July 2, 12:24 pm

    Just wanted to let you know the Narrator misspoke regarding the size of Tiger Sharks on the episode where the 20 year old female German tourist was attacked in Hawaii. He said they grow up to 25′. Actually they are normally between 11′ to 13′ with exceptionally big females being slightly over 16′.