8 Classic Photos to Get You in the Springtime Spirit

Spring in the northern hemisphere officially begins this Sunday, March 20th—coinciding with International Happiness Day! In celebration of blossoming flowers, fresh air, and sunshine during the warmer months ahead, enjoy some of our favorite springtime memories from National Geographic Magazine issues of the past century:

From 1972:

Photograph by Robert Sisson/NG Creative

A robin guards its nest within the branches of a blooming apple tree in Harmony Hollow, Virginia. The American Robin is a long-time icon of spring and is known for its orange belly, blue eggs and often being the last bird heard at sunset.

From 1966:

Pittsfield, Massachusetts- A young camper snuggles nose to nose with a baby rabbit. (Photo Credit: B. ANTHONY STEWART /NG Creative) Published in NGM 12/1966
Photograph by B. Anthony Stewart/NG Creative

A young camper snuggles with a baby rabbit in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. Rabbits have long been recognized as symbols of fertility and rebirth, hence their association with spring and Easter.

From 1947:

Washington, D.C.- Tourists walk among blossoming cherry trees by the Tidal Basin. (Photo Credit: B. ANTHONY STEWART /NG Creative) Published in NGM 06/1947
Photograph by B. Anthony Stewart/NG Creative

Tourists walk amid blossoming cherry trees in Washington, D.C. Every year since 1912 when the emperor of Japan gifted the United States with 3,000 cherry trees, the blooming trees welcome springtime to D.C and reaffirm the two countries’ friendship.

From 1969:

Fall River, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado- Bighorn lamb gambols in spring grass beside Fall River. (Photo Credit: JAMES L. AMOS /NG Creative) Published in NGM 08/1969
(Photohraph by James L. Amos/NG Creative

A Bighorn lamb gambols in spring grass beside Fall River in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. These lambs can walk and climb as well as their mothers at just one day old.

From 1957:

Roan Mountain, Tennessee- Two-year-old boy reaches for rhododendron leaves and blossoms. (Photo Credit: W.E. GARRETT /NG Creative) Published in NGM 06/1957
Photograph by W.E. Garrett/NG Creative

A two-year-old boy reaches for rhododendron leaves and blossoms in Tennessee. There are upwards of 1,000 different species of rhododendron that are grow in Europe, Asia, North America and Australia.

From 1971:

Canyonlands National Park, Utah- From a severe desert springs life in the form of a daisy. (Photo Credit: WALTER MEAYERS EDWARDS /NG Creative) Published in NGM 07/1971
Photograph by Walter Meayers Edward /NG Creative

From a severe desert springs life in the form of a daisy in Canyonlands National Park, Utah. The name, “daisy,” is thought to stem from the Anglo-Saxon phrase “daes eage,” meaning “day’s eye” because of the way it opens at dawn.

From 1942:

Lynchburg, Virginia- A small windmill and costumed ladies are amid tulips and dogwoods. (Photo Credit: B. ANTHONY STEWART /NG Creative) Published in NGM 05/1942
Photograph by B. Anthony Stewart

A small windmill and costumed ladies are amid tulips and dogwoods in Lynchwood, Virginia. Most tulips only bloom for between 3 and 7 days in the spring.

From 1940:

Vimoutiers, Basse Normandy Region, France- Two young girls appreciate a flower on their father's farm. (Photo Credit: HOWELL WALKER /NG Creative) Published in NGM 02/1940
(Photograph by Howell Walker/NG Creative)

Two young girls appreciate a flower on their father’s farm in Vimoutiers, Basse Normandy Region, France. The first spring flowers are typically daffodils, dandelions, lilies, tulips, iris and lilacs to name a few.

Happy Spring Equinox and 4th Annual International Happiness Day!