Vet School | New Series Premiere and Sneak Peek!

It’s that time of the year again. We’re saying goodbye to summer and getting ready to head back-to-school – “Vet School,” that is! Nat Geo Wild’s newest series follows along as veterinary students begin and end their school careers at Cornell University.

ITHACA, N.Y. - Vet professor Dr. McDaniels demonstrates how to properly examine a dog to first year students.

(photo credit:  National Geographic Channels/Lisa Tanzer)
ITHACA, N.Y. – Vet professor Dr. McDaniels demonstrates how to properly examine a dog to first year students.

(photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Lisa Tanzer)

Learning the ins and outs of veterinary medicine is a lot of hard work and long hours but these students are dedicated to this career and life choice they’ve made.

Throughout the series, we’ll see the students learning skills they’ll need in their chosen field, from making a diagnosis and fixing broken bones, to handling emergency procedures and life or death situations.

1st year students must learn the simplest, yet most important skills and quickly realize that each lesson builds to the next and that nothing they learn is inconsequential to their life from now on.

[Meet the Vet School Students]

4th year students put their knowledge to the test, as they advance to the ins and outs of patient care, client relations, and more hands on treatments with the animals. School doesn’t stop at the end of the day, as study continues constantly to prepare for their board exam and the goal of finding employment at the end of the year.

The entire season of Vet School premieres on September 19th and viewers can binge watch every episode starting the day after on NatGeoTV.com and other multiplatforms such as Nat Geo TV apps, Hulu, iTunes, and Amazon.

Can’t wait for fall? Neither can we! Get your fix of “Vet School” before the premiere! On August 19th, viewers can watch a 15-minute sneak peek from the first episode, where 1st year students begin learning the basics and 4th year students learn to put their training to good use, helping with difficult cases and patients.

Comments

  1. Star
    Chandler AZ
    September 27, 2015, 10:33 am

    Wrote a whole long comment and this dumb Captcha thing came AFTER the Submit button and I didn’t check it and it erased my words. Never returning to this site!

  2. Diane
    October 4, 2015, 2:33 pm

    I just watched an episode where they thought a black dog had cancer. So first, they do all kinds of expensive ultrasound to find no cancer there. THEN, they do expensive xrays of the lungs….no cancer there. LAST, they actually xray the lump in question and find out…no cancer THERE, just arthritis. Wasn’t that kind of a silly way to go about this diagnosis?