5 Bird Bosses That Rule The World

Tweet, chirp, or peep. Whatever the call, we love them all. From soaring great heights to traveling far distances, birds of all shapes and sizes rule the world from up above. Today we’re highlighting a few favorites. Meet five of the coolest and creepiest, biggest and baddest birds of all time.

1. The Cassowary

Cassowary - the largest bird in Australia

You don’t want to mess with this bird boss. The Cassowary is considered the most dangerous bird in the world, thanks to its dagger-like claws. With just a kick, this bird can slice open any predator. They also have powerful legs and can run up to 31 miles per hour and jump nearly 7 feet in the air.

2. Corvidae

Did you know birds are some of the smartest creatures in the world? The smartest being the Corvidae family. This bird band includes crows, ravens, and jays to name a few. For example, crows can reason, remember human faces, and make tools. These creatures have even tested smarter than apes in some studies, making them an obvious brainy bird boss.

3. Harpy Eagle

Harpy Eagle

The Harpy eagle is one of the most powerful birds in the world. Like many eagle species, females are almost twice as large as the males. Their legs can be as thick as a child’s wrist and its talons are larger than grizzly bear claws at 5 inches long and can exert several hundred pounds of pressure, making this creature a force not to be reckoned with.

4. Barn Owl

What makes this creature a bird boss? Barn owls rule the night world with their silent flight. Some other cool facts? Besides owls being able to turn their heads almost entirely around, they hear the same way humans do, and are one of the most sensitive hearing creatures around.

5. Bee Eater

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The bee-eater is not only colorful but also caring. This social bird breeds for life and is also one of the few species that helps others out when raising chicks. Some nests will have more than two adults feeding the young.

For more bird behavior, tune in to Real Angry Birds, Sunday 9/8c on Nat Geo WILD.