“Wild 24” Premieres Tonight!

Witness 24 hours on the savannas of Africa to the icy coastline of Antarctica, revealing behaviors of the many animals that battle it out to survive each day in these exotic, but demanding environments in the three-series premiere of Wild 24.

The first journey of this three-part series crosses twenty five countries that are home to millions of animals. Here, herbivores and carnivores are caught in a constant struggle for survival. Lion Battlefield charts a day in the life, revealing incredible behavior rarely seen before, all driven by the evolutionary clock of time. The relationships between predator and prey affect the sleeping habits for many of these animals, as day and night brings out different crowds and with night vision cameras, we are able to see the vibrant night activity across the savanna.

The male's mane is thinner in the hotter African climates. They can't sweat, but pant like dogs instead to release heat.  (Photo credit: © iStockphoto)
The male’s mane is thinner in the hotter African climates. They can’t sweat, but pant like dogs instead to release heat. (Photo credit: © iStockphoto)

 

Next, Scorched Earth takes us to Chile’s Atacama Desert. Sandwiched between the high Andes and the Pacific Ocean, many areas of the Atacama receive absolutely no rain. The only moisture comes from an ocean fog that sweeps inland most afternoons. Here, a group of hardy plants and animals survive with little to no water. Hump-less camels, penguins, seals, and birds share this harsh environment but with unlikely partnerships and unusual targets, these animals have learned to survive in this extreme land.

The Vicuna, part of the camlid family has the finest wool in the world. (Photo credit: © iStockphoto)
The Vicuna, part of the camlid family has the finest wool in the world. (Photo credit: © iStockphoto)

 

Lastly, in The Devil’s Island, we travel to the island of Tasmanian off the coast of Australia, that is home to some rare and unique creatures. This temperate climate with its extensive forests was once home to the extinct Tasmania Tiger. Now, its most famous inhabitant is the Tasmanian Devil. These ferocious marsupials, the size of a small dog, live in burrows and produce screams and growls that inspired its name. The forests are also home to other marsupials, including the carnivorous quoll rarely seen on mainland Australia.

The Spotted-Tailed Quoll is a marsupial that can kill prey much larger than itself.  (Photo credit: © NHNZ Moving Images Library)
The Spotted-Tailed Quoll is a marsupial that can kill prey much larger than itself. (Photo credit: © NHNZ Moving Images Library)

Tune in tonight for the series premiere of Wild 24 at 8/7c.