For Mick Dodge, living off the grid comes easy. However, for some of his other woodland friends, the outside world comes crashing in uninvited.

On tonight’s new episode Passing The Torch, Mick helps his student and friend Will of Stone find a new place to live. Will is in the process of transitioning to an off-the-grid lifestyle, and when loggers encroach on his cabin’s woodsy location, he needs Mick’s guidance to build a new primitive shelter. With the loggers devastating the forest, Mick and Will venture deeper into the forest to find a new sanctuary.

Catch the all-new episode of Mick Dodge tonight at 10P.

Watch: Mick and Will build a forest roundhouse, an ancient structure that the Celts inhabited thousands of years ago.

Comments

  1. Marcia
    va
    January 29, 6:35 am

    Love learning about what I’m thinking about doing one day.
    I find the stashes interesting. Love the forest.!!

  2. Patricia Mulder
    CA
    January 29, 7:35 pm

    Been there done that. Not quite ot as thouroughly but you may have heard of the pot culture of northern CA? I did that years ago and now my son is following along in my mocassins.

  3. Dan Busch
    Gig Harbor WA
    January 30, 7:27 pm

    I have erected and camped in tents, tarps, snow caves, debris shelters, lean-tos, hammocks, etc. but this is a new one! I think Mick and friends are an absolute gas! I can’t wait to try this!

  4. Larry Abernathy
    Piedmont, MO
    February 2, 2:55 pm

    National Geographic, if they do claim Mick Dodge, has lowered itself to a new level of embarrassment! How ignorant do they think the American public is?

  5. Lee Crews
    Orange Va,
    February 4, 3:23 pm

    they will put anything on t.v. how much is mick getting for running around the woods. reality shows sure are getting lame. i can’t believe anyone thinks this is true. i be a shamed to call this entertainment. it only took me one time know that this is bs.i know why the photographer won’t say his name. he might want another job someday.

  6. Danny Farrish
    February 4, 3:25 pm

    If you can’t find something better to put on t.v. just shut it down.

  7. […] See the article here: Watch: Mick Dodge's Primitive Build – Nat Geo TV Blogs […]

  8. Dawn Webb
    S E Kansas
    February 12, 7:48 pm

    Isn’t this the same actor who played “Harry” in “Harry and the Hendersons”? My family and I watch the show for a good laugh. I sincerely hope that people do not listen to his wisdom when it comes to what to eat and use for medicine. Maybe Nat Geo should think about fools who might listen to this nonsense as guidance in nature before they air this crap.

  9. aharon Lansaw
    United States
    February 15, 4:32 pm

    why no pic of the finished product?

  10. SAGE
    FLA
    March 4, 1:21 am

    Due to the social mores.ways ways of thinking , the controlling of ones beliefs and/or thoughts,and why we should conform to these ways a standard life should be lived.Why in all hells means should I conform to the needs of others needs.Yeah you can call me defiant but I’m for and about getting as far away from society to live by the means of simplicity.I.m about and for what some of these ladies have to say.Sooner or later we’ll figure out the needs and to have a mountain lady at my side eating things most are opposed to couldn’t make my life rejectable but happy and sustainable.How simple is that.

  11. SurvivorMama
    Washington
    March 27, 11:31 am

    Mick love the woods but is not a wild man. He is a character ,though. The roundhouse with a reciprocating roof, when done, is a decent remipermanent seller for the purposes of the show. Yes, the show (just as with History Channel, discovery and Animal Planet) does a lot of faking for tv…but we should all know that, right? Armchair survivalists and weekend warriors should get a laugh then get back to work.

    Back to task, a more permanent roundhouse needs a foundation (preferably stone) to handle load bearing without failing or rotting. Wattled walls can be packed with cob for insulation, and the reciprocating roof with built in smoke hole (vented adequately in the show) is covered with thatch secured to the purlins.