Archives for April, 2011

The First Baseball Stadium

In 1919, the New York Yankees acquired a pitcher-turned-outfielder named Babe Ruth from the Boston Red Sox, a move that forever changed baseball. In Yankee pinstripes, Ruth would become a full-time outfielder and blossom overnight into the greatest power hitter the game had ever seen–and trigger a surge in popularity that would transform baseball into…

Mysteries of the Great Wall

The Great Wall of China is one of the greatest engineering wonders on the planet. Every year millions of tourists visit this system of defensive lines – often called the Stone Dragon – that stretches from the mountains to the sea. The original fortress idea can be traced back to the third century B.C. But there…

Society Rules

From scaring skin to resemble a crocodile hide to the autopsy of a human’s remains, beauty and death are controversial topics. And what one culture views as normal and common, for another might be taboo… CROCODILE SCARS For some people, the idea of intentional skin disfigurement would be taboo. But in the remote village of…

Guardian Angel or Hallucination?

In October 1915, the polar exploration ship the Endurance was crushed by Antarctic ice, tearing out the ship’s stern and rudder posts and breaking the main deck, and forcing the crew to take refuge on an ice floe. In the months that followed, the expedition gradually ran out of provisions, and its leaders explorer Sir James Shackleton,…

Earth Day Awareness: Plastic Waste

Around the world, our appetite for one-time-use plastics is making a devastating impact on our natural world. Think you know what happens to that plastic razor, milk jug, bottle or bag tossed in the trash?  Each year, in the United States alone, more than 31 million tons of plastic are thrown out. Two billion disposable…

Oceans: Need-to-Have, Not Nice-to-Have

A blog from Plastiki crew member and TreeHugger founder, Graham Hill. This piece was originally written for the Huffington Post. It’s about a week into the Kiribati to Fiji or New Caledonia or wherever we end up being able to make it to on this side-slipping, 60 foot raft made from recyclable plastic and 12,500…

Restrepo Director Tim Hetherington Killed in Libya

National Geographic is devastated by the tragic news of Tim Hetherington’s death in Libya. This is a sad and terrible day. We join the community of dedicated photojournalists and documentarians around the world who are mourning his loss. Our thoughts are also with his family, who just released this statement: “It is with great sadness…

Black Market Relics of the Murdered Saints

Since the early days of Christianity, some particularly fervent believers have venerated the remains of martyred saints or objects they once possessed, out of a belief that God utilizes those relics as a vehicle for performing miracles. Handkerchiefs touched by St. Paul supposedly were able to cure the sick. A catechism written at the Council of Trent…

Radical Body Reshaping

In a poor, remote village on the Thai-Burmese border, many local Kayan women carry an item of great value – brass rings – around their necks. These shiny collars can weigh up to twenty-two pounds, disfiguring the bodies of those who wear them. This tradition has been part of Kayan culture for nearly one thousand years, and ancient…

Be on a Nat Geo Wild Show!

Want to become one of the stars of Wild? We’re launching a brand new series where our team of wildlife investigators solve animal mysteries in people’s own backyards. Are your pets under attack? Is something stealing the fish from your fish pond? What is the source of the strange shrieking you hear in the dead…