If you ever wished you could tie balloons to your house to finally explore the wilds of South America like you’ve always wanted without having to pack one suitcase, you’re in luck… it is possible. Well, sort of. 

All you need is a team of scientists, engineers, world-class balloon pilots, a 16X16 ft house, 300 balloons that fill up to 8 ft tall when inflated, and the National Geographic Channel and you’re all set! Easy as pie. 
Setting a new world record for the largest balloon cluster flight ever attempted, the entire aircraft from top to bottom was a whopping 10-stories high, made it to an alititude of 10,000 feet, and flew for about an hour. You can catch the full story when the new series “How Hard Can it Be?” premieres later this fall on the National Geographic Channel. 
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What will they test next? 
Check out behind-the-scenes footage: 

Comments

  1. francie1018
    March 8, 2011, 7:28 pm

    Where all these huge weather balloons filled with helium? I recall in the February 2011 magazine issue that there is a short article about the Earth’s shortage of helium. I find this ironic since the very top of this website reads: "Inspiring people to care about the planet since 1888"
    Here is the link to the short article:

    http://blogs.ngm.com/blog_central/2011/02/bye-bye-helium.html

  2. francie1018
    March 8, 2011, 7:29 pm

    Where all these huge weather balloons filled with helium? I recall in the February 2011 magazine issue that there is a short article about the Earth’s shortage of helium. I find this ironic since the very top of this website reads: "Inspiring people to care about the planet since 1888"
    Here is the link to the short article:

    http://blogs.ngm.com/blog_central/2011/02/bye-bye-helium.html

  3. ?????????
    March 9, 2011, 4:11 pm

    How did this thing land?

  4. jpg391
    May 1, 2011, 3:56 pm

    WOW! I can hardly wait for "How Hard Can It Be" to premiere in the fall.