King of the Coral Reef


blog post photo

© Tesche Dokumentarfilm

The Moray eel, with his writhing mass, dagger-like teeth, lightning-quick movements and fearsome reputation, could be crowned King of the Coral Reef. 

There are over 200 species of Moray eel, each with a unique camouflage that perfectly suits their warm, coastal realm. Their smooth skin is coated in a thick mucus that can change the eel’s color – Green Morays, for example, might appear slimy and yellow, but they’re actually blue in hue.

blog post photo

© Tesche Dokumentarfilm

Moray eel’s have powerful, finless bodies with 100 flexible vertebrae, giving them the ability to tunnel into tiny crevices and gracefully swim in a characteristic s-shape through the sea’s shallow waters.

The Moray eel’s bite can do serious harm to an unlucky human victim. Rows of sharp teeth can inflect quite the wound – they have not just one but two sets of jaws. Even if wounds aren’t severe, infection can pose a serious health risk.

In some areas around the world, divers feed Morays to photograph and observe the species up close in the wild. But beware – this species has poor eyesight, and they might mistake fingers for fish, so its best to avoid interacting with these magnificent sea monsters.

blog post photo

© Tesche Dokumentarfilm

Join wildlife journalists and photographers as they explore the underworld off the islands of Ko Phi Phi in search of Moray eels in Morays: The Alien Eels, Tuesday, November 4th at 7pm et on Nat Geo WILD!