Archives for July, 2010

The Devil’s Bible

In the early 13th century, a monk disobeys the rules at a Bohemia Benedictine monastery. His punishment is to be walled up alive. But the monk pleads for his life. “I’ll write a book that will glorify the monastery forever,” he says, “a book that contains all human knowledge.” But that night, the monk despairs…

Notes from a Dog Walker

Dog walkers feed, walk and play with beloved pets while their owners are at work or on vacation. A day in the life of a dog walker can often be a mysterious experience, known only between human and canine. Because of this, dog walkers often leave behind letters with specific grading systems that rate a…

Coastal Crisis!

The refloat attempt of the Colombo Queen continues in Taiwan, as salvors return to the wreck site after typhoon Morakot has passed. Re-assessing the damage, the tanker is in bad shape, and it is going to take an almighty effort to even attempt a refloat. Meanwhile another storm, Hurricane Ida, has ripped through the Gulf,…

Monkeys Hunt for Breakfast

In Jaipur, things go from bad to worse for Rani and her rhesus macaque troop. Her alpha male has been captured by monkey catchers; her baby son Teejay is missing; and she’s lost her beloved temple home to the langur monkeys. To make matters worse, Rani has no idea her old enemy Zamir is back…

MySci Round-Up, July 28: Vitruvian Woman’s Tupperware Party!

Today is the 103rd birthday of the late Earl Tupper, a tinkerer who set out to be a 20th century-version of Leonardo da Vinci. In the fashion of Leonardo,Tupper kept an elaborately illustrated notebook of his own myriad inventions, which included pants with a permanent crease, a fish-powered automobile, a convertible top for rumble seats,…

Aerial Surveying of Wild Manta Ray Populations

New data concluded that there is more than one species of manta ray, and scientists are busy collecting information on their behaviors, markings and populations. The Georgia Aquarium recently funded an aerial surveying research project on manta rays, a study that took place over a six-week time period. But why collect this data on manta…

Hope The Wig Fits!

by Rebecca CodyProducer 12th February 2010I’ve just arrived in Latin America, tired after nearly 2 days of travelling, but tremendously excited. The air is warm, I’ve left the vicious cold behind, I’m happy. I’ve been met by my fixer, Paola at the airport, and she has given me the best chocolate I have ever tasted…

Who Wrote the Dead Sea Scrolls?

by Dr. Bob CargillArchaeologist, UCLA March 2010 Who really wrote the Dead Sea Scrolls? That is the subject of a forthcoming documentary produced by CTVC for National Geographic Channel. I was asked to be among the interviewees who include (in alphabetical order): • Robert Cargill• Rachel Elior• Shimon Gibson• Jan Gunneweg• Gideon Hadas• Jean-Baptiste Humbert• Jodi…

Masters of Imitation

Photo Credit: Jodi Kendall, taken at the Georgia Aquarium An octopus is a skilled mimic and artist of camouflage. In order to deceive a predator, he can morph into unique shapes, change color and texture, and even alter his behavior to make a quick escape. One such example has been documented on video. This octopus…

MySci Round-Up, July 27: UFOs over DC

Given the current brouhaha in Congress over immigration reform, it’s easy to forget that on this day 58 years ago, Washingtonians were worried about illegal aliens of a different sort. This declassified Air Force report describes the sighting of a UFO hovering over the Pentagon on the evening of July 27, 1952. The witness, a woman from…