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The old truism is that pictures don’t lie. Indeed, some photographic evidence of paranormal phenomena — for example, the Los Angeles Times picture of a luminous object caught in anti-aircraft searchlights over Los Angeles in 1942, which we discussed in a previous blog — are genuinely, provocatively difficult to explain.

Some look to be at least reasonably plausible, such as the famous 1934 “surgeon’s photo” that purported to show the Loch Ness Monster taking a surface swim. (Sixty years later, to paranormal believers’ immense disappointment, an elderly participant in the hoax revealed it to be a toy submarine outfitted with a sea-serpent head.)

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And then there are the photos of supposed phenomena that require a leap of faith comparable to Evel Knievel’s disastrous attempted Snake Canyon Jump in 1974. I’m talking about the kind that strain credulity so mightily that they make this face of Jesus on a piece of toast look like Rubens’  Christ Risen by comparison.

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My nominee for the least plausible paranormal photography hall of fame is this intriguing picture, which apparently shows Adolf Hitler shaking hands with what appears to be a space alien. 

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Scholarly biographies of the Nazi dictator inexplicably fail to mention a summit between the Nazi dictator and extraterrestrials, and there is nary a reference to it in Hitler aide Albert Speer’s memoirs or the proceedings of the Nuremberg tribunal. That leads me to conclude that there must have been a postwar cover-up even more far-reaching and sinister than the cabal by those state officials in Hawaii who refuse to re-investigate the legitimacy of President Obama’s birth certificate. Of course, there’s also the remote possibility that somebody, somewhere has a copy of Adobe Photoshop and way too much time on his hands. You be the judge.

Anyone out there know anything about the origin of this photo? I’d love to hear the story behind it. Also, if you find an implausible paranormal photo on the Web of your own, send me the link at patrickjkiger@gmail.com.

If I find it equally fascinating, maybe I’ll write about it. And in the meantime, enjoy this undoubtedly tasty recipe for an alien autopsy gelatin mold dessert.