Lots of veterinarians have fascinating case stories. So recently I connected with some graduates of the University of Florida College of Veterinary Science and obtained radiograph images of objects swallowed by dogs they had treated. Think you can identify the things they found in the dog’s bellies?

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ANSWERS:

Photo #1: Fish Hook
The placement of this fish hook in the dog’s stomach required surgery, and the dog fully recovered after this incident.

Photo and surgery credit: Dr. Moody McCall, San Pablo Animal Hospital

Photo Credit #2: Apple Name Place Holder
After a dinner party, this dog stole a few scraps off the table. The owner witnessed this happening, and the dog was taken to Dr. Nicholas Bacon on emergency. This apple-shaped name place holder was removed successfully endoscopically (instead of surgery).

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Photo and surgery credit: Dr. Nicholas Bacon, University of Florida College of Medicine

Photo #3: Golf Ball
This dog swallowed a golf ball after retrieving it for his owner. During surgery, the veterinarian also found a triangular piece of tile, wire and the dog’s name tag.

Photo and surgery credit: Dr. Moody McCall, San Pablo Animal Hospital

Photo #4: Sewing Needle
This sewing needle passed safely through the dog in its stool, and no further action was required.

Photo and surgery credit: Dr. Moody McCall, San Pablo Animal Hospital

Tune-in to Nat Geo Wild this Sunday night starting at 8P et/pt for more unbelievable stories of My Dog Ate What?

Comments

  1. HowlerWolf
    June 26, 2010, 5:21 pm

    Interesting! I never thought dogs would be crazy enough to eat stuff like that, but hey, anything’s possible!

  2. Chloe
    gHrPSBzYLvRga
    February 28, 2012, 8:25 am

    I think it’s more a meattr of choosing your dog carefully. Some breeds/sizes/temperaments thrive in cities and even with apartment living. Some, like those with strong prey drives or working instincts, may not unless some sort of surrogate is created for their natural needs. Mr. Parsons Russell terrier, in your picture is not only social but has a strong prey drive and urge to work. So, while he’s a small doggie, he’s not really the type to be left alone, with limited stimuli and not much leeway to entertain himself. My puggle, OTOH, is a lazy hound that is happy thoroughly smelling an area of approximately 2 square feet for hours on end (not that I’d ever leave him more than a few minutes), and when he gets bored with that, there’s always sleeping or being adored by passers-by. But, I do often wish we had a little more relaxed attitude about pets in dining and social establishments. I think a lot of our pets never get the chance to be properly socialized to truly be integrated into a city environment. I miss the experience of tripping over someone’s bulldog in the cafe.